WHAT ARE THE ESSENTIAL THINGS TO KNOW WHEN PURCHASING A HOUSE

The things you should look out for when purchasing a house.

CHAMAN LAW FIRM

2/20/202220 min read

WHAT ARE THE ESSENTIAL THINGS TO KNOW WHEN PURCHASING A HOUSE

Things to know when purchasing a house When buying a house, everyone has priorities. The buying process is complex and takes time, and it’s easy to get off track. Having written priorities is a helpful way to guide you through the process without forgetting some of the features that are important to you and your family.

Your realtor will also want to understand your prioritized list. Understanding which features mean the most will help eliminate houses that won’t work for you and compare the homes that will.

Buyers want to find a location that allows easy access to the places they frequent the most (work, school, shopping, recreation, place of worship, friends and family). Look for easy access to the main roads and check traffic flow.

Checking this out before a purchase can help save you from hassles getting out of the neighborhood and onto the main thoroughfare or from an unreasonably long commute.

  1. Location

The location of the home within the neighborhood is also important to many people. Some people prefer a lot near the main entry, while others like to be away from traffic and further into the development.

If there is a park, pool or recreation area, some owners would choose the closest available lot. Cul-de-sacs are favored by some, and some people like living on the main boulevard. Talk about your preferences, and ask your realtor if certain lot locations bring a higher purchase price.

  1. Size

Many people give little thought to the size of the lot the house sits on. Within a neighborhood, the lot sizes might be fairly similar. Once you’re going to showings and looking at what’s available, you’ll soon see if you have a clear preference of large or small, corner or interior.

Some lots are pie-shaped; some are rectangular, and some are irregular in shape. Depending on the level of privacy, how you will use the lawn, and the length of the driveway, this might matter to you.

If there seems to be a question about where one lot ends, and another begins, check the lot description and dimensions with your realtor. If you find a house that includes two lots, think about the possibilities.

If the second lot is buildable, you could possibly add another building (extra garage, workshop,etc.) or you might split the property, build a second home and sell it, or sell the lot as is.

3. Number of Bedrooms

 

HOMEiA

10 Important Features to Consider When Buying a House

by Gloria Russell

May 30, 2021

When buying a house, everyone has priorities. The buying process is complex and takes time, and it’s easy to get off track. Having written priorities is a helpful way to guide you through the process without forgetting some of the features that are important to you and your family.

Your realtor will also want to understand your prioritized list. Understanding which features mean the most will help eliminate houses that won’t work for you and compare the homes that will.

In this article, we’ll discuss about things to consider when buying a new house. Each will rank differently in importance for individual buyers, but all points are worth examining. If you haven’t already thought seriously about these factors, now is your chance.

And, if you’re buying the home with your special someone, talk it over to make sure you agree on the importance of each feature. Let’s check it out.

Here’re 10 important features to consider when buying a house.

 

Table of Contents:

1. Location of the house

2. The size of the lot

3. Number of bedrooms

4. Number of bathrooms

5. The Kitchen layout

6. The age, style and condition of home appliances

7. Age of the house

8. The price

9. Seller’s incentive to sell

10. Maintenance mode

 

1. Location of the house

Location of the house, location location location

Buyers want to find a location that allows easy access to the places they frequent the most (work, school, shopping, recreation, place of worship, friends and family). Look for easy access to the main roads and check traffic flow.

Checking this out before a purchase can help save you from hassles getting out of the neighborhood and onto the main thoroughfare or from an unreasonably long commute.

The location of the home within the neighborhood is also important to many people. Some people prefer a lot near the main entry, while others like to be away from traffic and further into the development.

If there is a park, pool or recreation area, some owners would choose the closest available lot. Cul-de-sacs are favored by some, and some people like living on the main boulevard. Talk about your preferences, and ask your realtor if certain lot locations bring a higher purchase price.

10 Important Features to Consider When Buying a House

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2. The size of the lot

The size of the lot, big lot or small lot

Many people give little thought to the size of the lot the house sits on. Within a neighborhood, the lot sizes might be fairly similar. Once you’re going to showings and looking at what’s available, you’ll soon see if you have a clear preference of large or small, corner or interior.

Some lots are pie-shaped; some are rectangular, and some are irregular in shape. Depending on the level of privacy, how you will use the lawn, and the length of the driveway, this might matter to you.

If there seems to be a question about where one lot ends, and another begins, check the lot description and dimensions with your realtor. If you find a house that includes two lots, think about the possibilities.

If the second lot is buildable, you could possibly add another building (extra garage, workshop, etc.) or you might split the property, build a second home and sell it, or sell the lot as is.

10 Important Features to Consider When Buying a House

10 Most Affordable Places to Live in Florida

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3. Number of bedrooms

Number of bedrooms, bedroom size

Each family will have an idea of how many bedrooms they would like. Most people will want at least two, and if there are children, the number increases.

Some families like their kids to share bedrooms, while others like separate bedrooms for each to accommodate different bedtimes and study habits. If you have regular visitors for any length of time, it’s nice to have a bedroom that is designated as a guest room.

An extra bedroom often doubles as an office, den, kids’ playroom, or exercise room. Many hobbies can require working space and storage for supplies, and an extra bedroom serves this purpose well. Think carefully about your lifestyle and what will enhance it.

4.Number of bathrooms

Decide ahead of time how many bathrooms you prefer. Older homes might have only one bathroom, and buyers will often look for ways to add another.

If there is only one bathroom, be sure you can live with that arrangement if remodeling isn’t feasible. Newer homes generally have two or more bathrooms, although some bathrooms might not have a tub or shower.

The size and style of a bathroom are important as well. Do you want a bathtub or shower or both? Jacuzzi tubs are popular for relaxing, and some people prefer a shower stall for easy access. If you need a handicap accessible bathroom, you can look for that, or a sizable bath that could be remodeled.

Think about the people (including guests) who will be using the bathrooms, and you’ll get a clearer idea of the size and style of bathroom that will work best for your family.

5.The kitchen truly seems to be the heart of the home. It is where great food is created for the family and friends who gather there. When guests arrive, they usually end up hanging out in the kitchen, and because it’s a center of activity and entertainment, the size and layout are important.

Be clear on whether you need a large gourmet kitchen with lots of counter space, sinks and storage or if a typical kitchen will suffice.

Each family has different ideas about cooking. There’s the person who said the only reason there was a kitchen is because it came with the house! In that case, any kitchen would do.

Then, there’s the vegetarian who cooks daily and uses a lot of fresh ingredients, or the quick cook who microwaves all the meals. Some people entertain a lot or have large families to feed. Whatever style of cooking you are into, the kitchen will require a close look.

6. Age of the house

If you are not looking to renovate, some houses that meet all your requirements may have been built several decades ago. A factor to consider when buying a house is the age of the property. An older home may have its certain charm and appeal, but in turn, may need more upgrades, repairs, and improvements. If you are interested in an older home, make sure you have the time and budget for renovation projects. Building codes are also a thing to consider when buying an older house. Codes may have changed over the years, so having a basic understanding of the building laws then and now can help you better understand the state of the house. Consult your realtor as they may know the state of the house or where to find the information.

7. Appliances

Home appliances can be expensive to replace. Consider your preference for home appliances as well as the age of the current appliances in the home. Upgraded appliances can be a requirement or a bonus for some homebuyers, but they may not be necessary for others.

. Maintenance

Include the cost of the home’s maintenance in your budget. Some projects may be cosmetic and easy to complete. Other projects may require more time and money. The age and condition of the home at the time of purchase will impact the cost of repairs and maintenance.

9. Seller’s Incentive

One factor to consider when buying a house is that some sellers are more motivated than others, while some are more apathetic to whether their house sells or not. It’s common for some sellers to place their homes on the market but are not looking for a quick sale. These homeowners are happy to continue living in their homes for the time being. In effect, there may not be much room for price negotiation. On the other hand, a seller may be highly motivated. This may be due to an estate sale, a sudden need to move out such as a job relocation, or someone looking to pay off one of their mortgages with another. Consult your realtor to determine the motivations a seller may have and how to counteroffer and negotiate properly.

10. Purchase price

Of course, the home’s purchase price will play a large role in whether or not you should buy a home. Come up with a budget that is right for you, and be sure to stick to it. Consider all costs

and make a decision that will accommodate your finances and goal

11. House Size

You should have a general idea of what size house you want before you even find a real estate agent. Figure out a minimum and maximum square footage and the number of bedrooms and bathrooms you’ll need.

What size house you should buy will depend on your needs and your personal preferences. If you have a large family or plan on starting one soon, you’ll probably need to look at houses with more square footage as well as more bedrooms and bathrooms. On the other hand, if your household is just you or you and a partner, it may make more sense and be more affordable to look at smaller houses.

While one of the main upsides of having a larger house is that you have plenty of room for members of your household in addition to house guests, there are also many pros to having a smaller home. Small houses are easier and cheaper to furnish, which can be helpful if you’re just starting out. They also tend to be easier to keep clean and less expensive to maintain.

However, how small you can go before it goes from feeling cozy to cramped is also a matter of personal preference. It may be helpful to look at houses of various sizes to get a feel for what would work for you.

12. The Ideal Yard

Another matter of personal preference is what kind of yard you’d like. Do you want a lot of acreage and beautiful, low-maintenance landscaping? Or would you prefer to avoid the responsibility that comes with having a big lawn? Maybe you want a home that sits back further from the road, providing a little more privacy.

You’ll also have to think about what kind of features you want in the backyard. You can find homes with all sorts of natural and human-made features from streams and ponds to pools, hot tubs, patios, swing sets, decks, built-in grills and more. For some home buyers, these are attractive and useful features.

For others, they signal liability, expense and time commitment. Alternatively, if a backyard doesn’t currently have the features you want, is it suited to have those features added after you move in?

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Buying A House? Look For These 10 Things

Hanna Kielar

10-Minute Read

Published on December 13, 2021

Share:

Shopping for a new home to rent or buy can be overwhelming. And if you decide to buy, such an expensive purchase and long-term commitment will make you want to be certain you’re going to be satisfied.

In this article, we’ll talk about what to look for when buying a house and what you need to consider when evaluating the most important elements of a home.

What To Look For When Buying A House

Of course, choosing a home is a highly personal decision. As you think about the different aspects of a home, rank their level of importance to your needs and then decide which are negotiable and which are deal-breakers.If you haven’t already, you should determine how much home you can afford and what kind of area you’d like to live in (including neighborhood and school district) before you start seriously looking at houses.

Below are the top 10 considerations you should take note of when viewing properties.

1. House Size

You should have a general idea of what size house you want before you even find a real estate agent. Figure out a minimum and maximum square footage and the number of bedrooms and bathrooms you’ll need.

What size house you should buy will depend on your needs and your personal preferences. If you have a large family or plan on starting one soon, you’ll probably need to look at houses with more square footage as well as more bedrooms and bathrooms. On the other hand, if your household is just you or you and a partner, it may make more sense and be more affordable to look at smaller houses.

While one of the main upsides of having a larger house is that you have plenty of room for members of your household in addition to house guests, there are also many pros to having a smaller home. Small houses are easier and cheaper to furnish, which can be helpful if you’re just starting out. They also tend to be easier to keep clean and less expensive to maintain.

However, how small you can go before it goes from feeling cozy to cramped is also a matter of personal preference. It may be helpful to look at houses of various sizes to get a feel for what would work for you.

2. The Ideal Yard

Another matter of personal preference is what kind of yard you’d like. Do you want a lot of acreage and beautiful, low-maintenance landscaping? Or would you prefer to avoid the responsibility that comes with having a big lawn? Maybe you want a home that sits back further from the road, providing a little more privacy.

You’ll also have to think about what kind of features you want in the backyard. You can find homes with all sorts of natural and human-made features from streams and ponds to pools, hot tubs, patios, swing sets, decks, built-in grills and more. For some home buyers, these are attractive and useful features.

For others, they signal liability, expense and time commitment. Alternatively, if a backyard doesn’t currently have the features you want, is it suited to have those features added after you move in?

When considering what sort of yard would be good for you, think about lot size, maintenance requirements, how much it’ll cost to maintain and what features you’d like in both the front and back.

3. The House’s Exterior

Don’t let your excitement about a perfect interior make you forget the importance of a sturdy exterior.

Your main line of defense against buying a home with a deteriorating exterior will be your home inspection, but it’s still a good idea to keep an eye out for red flags, whether on your own time or by leaning on a trusted real estate agent.

Here are some of the main exterior components you should be sure to check out when viewing a house:

Roof: This is a big one, as a new roof can cost $5,000 to $15,000 or more. Be sure to give the roof (or what you can see of it) a once-over, looking for any signs of damage. You may also want to ask how old the roof is, although you don’t necessarily need to be turned off by an older roof. A well-maintained, sturdy one can last several decades, depending on the type of roof materials used. You may even get a discount on your homeowners insurance if your new house has a roof with special shingles that are designed for harsh weather.

Foundation: Foundation problems can cause a lot of heartache in the form of thousands to tens of thousands of dollars to repair. To spot a bad foundation, keep an eye out for cracks in the walls (particularly those around doorways or windows). Doors and windows that stick or jam are another warning sign. Ultimately, you’ll want to get a professional to sign off on the state of the home’s foundation.

Siding: Check out the exterior walls for any obvious signs of damage or disrepair, including peeling paint, rotting wood, cracks or other signs of decay.

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Home Learn Things Look Shopping Next Home

couple house hunting online

Buying A House? Look For These 10 Things

Hanna Kielar

10-Minute Read

Published on December 13, 2021

Share:

Shopping for a new home to rent or buy can be overwhelming. And if you decide to buy, such an expensive purchase and long-term commitment will make you want to be certain you’re going to be satisfied.

In this article, we’ll talk about what to look for when buying a house and what you need to consider when evaluating the most important elements of a home.

What To Look For When Buying A House

Of course, choosing a home is a highly personal decision. As you think about the different aspects of a home, rank their level of importance to your needs and then decide which are negotiable and which are deal-breakers.If you haven’t already, you should determine how much home you can afford and what kind of area you’d like to live in (including neighborhood and school district) before you start seriously looking at houses.

Below are the top 10 considerations you should take note of when viewing properties.

1. House Size

You should have a general idea of what size house you want before you even find a real estate agent. Figure out a minimum and maximum square footage and the number of bedrooms and bathrooms you’ll need.

What size house you should buy will depend on your needs and your personal preferences. If you have a large family or plan on starting one soon, you’ll probably need to look at houses with more square footage as well as more bedrooms and bathrooms. On the other hand, if your household is just you or you and a partner, it may make more sense and be more affordable to look at smaller houses.

While one of the main upsides of having a larger house is that you have plenty of room for members of your household in addition to house guests, there are also many pros to having a smaller home. Small houses are easier and cheaper to furnish, which can be helpful if you’re just starting out. They also tend to be easier to keep clean and less expensive to maintain.

However, how small you can go before it goes from feeling cozy to cramped is also a matter of personal preference. It may be helpful to look at houses of various sizes to get a feel for what would work for you.

2. The Ideal Yard

Another matter of personal preference is what kind of yard you’d like. Do you want a lot of acreage and beautiful, low-maintenance landscaping? Or would you prefer to avoid the responsibility that comes with having a big lawn? Maybe you want a home that sits back further from the road, providing a little more privacy.

You’ll also have to think about what kind of features you want in the backyard. You can find homes with all sorts of natural and human-made features from streams and ponds to pools, hot tubs, patios, swing sets, decks, built-in grills and more. For some home buyers, these are attractive and useful features.

For others, they signal liability, expense and time commitment. Alternatively, if a backyard doesn’t currently have the features you want, is it suited to have those features added after you move in?

When considering what sort of yard would be good for you, think about lot size, maintenance requirements, how much it’ll cost to maintain and what features you’d like in both the front and back.

3. The House’s Exterior

Don’t let your excitement about a perfect interior make you forget the importance of a sturdy exterior.

Your main line of defense against buying a home with a deteriorating exterior will be your home inspection, but it’s still a good idea to keep an eye out for red flags, whether on your own time or by leaning on a trusted real estate agent.

Here are some of the main exterior components you should be sure to check out when viewing a house:

Roof: This is a big one, as a new roof can cost $5,000 to $15,000 or more. Be sure to give the roof (or what you can see of it) a once-over, looking for any signs of damage. You may also want to ask how old the roof is, although you don’t necessarily need to be turned off by an older roof. A well-maintained, sturdy one can last several decades, depending on the type of roof materials used. You may even get a discount on your homeowners insurance if your new house has a roof with special shingles that are designed for harsh weather.

Foundation: Foundation problems can cause a lot of heartache in the form of thousands to tens of thousands of dollars to repair. To spot a bad foundation, keep an eye out for cracks in the walls (particularly those around doorways or windows). Doors and windows that stick or jam are another warning sign. Ultimately, you’ll want to get a professional to sign off on the state of the home’s foundation.

Siding: Check out the exterior walls for any obvious signs of damage or disrepair, including peeling paint, rotting wood, cracks or other signs of decay.

4. Bedrooms

Whether or not the house’s bedrooms are suitable for your needs will depend on what you plan on using them for. For example, families with small children might not want a house where the primary bedroom is on a different floor from the kids’ bedrooms.

If you plan on converting an extra bedroom into a home office, you might prefer a layout where the bedrooms are farther away from the hustle and bustle of the kitchen and living room. Ultimately, it’s going to come down to what best fits your needs.

Again, the size and number of bedrooms are important considerations. However, there are plenty of other factors you should also think about, including closet space, sources of natural and artificial light, views from the windows, general privacy and whether there’s an attached bathroom to the primary bedroom.

The one seemingly small detail that can end up being a big deal is the number and location of electrical outlets. This is especially important if the natural or built-in light in a bedroom isn’t sufficient, as you’ll be plugging in at least one or two lamps.

5. Bathrooms

When you’re checking out the bathroom, make sure everything’s in working order:

With the seller’s or REALTOR’s permission, flush the toilets, test the faucets and even turn on the shower.

Make sure the fan works.

Look under the sink and around the toilet for leaks and water damage.

Keep an eye out for mold.

It may seem a little overbearing, but if you’re seriously considering buying a house, you’ll want to make sure there are no surprises after you move in, such as low water pressure or plumbing problems.

Make a note of what type of shower or tub each bathroom has, too. Is it just a shower, or is it a shower and bathtub combo? Does it have glass doors or a curtain? Is the bathtub made of porcelain or plastic? Bathroom renovations can be costly, so make sure you’re either happy with the bathrooms as-is or prepared to pay for improvements down the line.

6. Living Room

What are you looking for in a living room? Do you want it to feel cozy and warm or chic and modern? Keep your ideas in mind when looking at the living room but try not to let any current decor sway you. Instead, look at the basic layout and style of the room. Does it fit your taste? Could you see yourself relaxing in this space?

If you already have furniture that you plan on moving into your new home, how well do you see it blending with the style of the room? Buying new furniture isn’t as expensive as purchasing a house, but it isn’t cheap, either.

Consider the layout of the room as well as the location of any wall outlets. Are there electrical and cable outlets near where you may want to put a TV? Is the room large enough for your needs? Do you want a carpeted living room for your kids to comfortably play in?

7. Heating And Cooling Systems

Unless you work in HVAC, you probably aren’t an expert in evaluating the condition of a home’s heating and cooling systems. There are some basic questions that impact day-to-day life that you’ll want answered.

Find out what type of heating and cooling system the house has. There are several different types of systems that control the temperature of your home, each with its own pros and cons.

What kind of heating does the house have? Is it a forced-air system powered by a furnace? Does the furnace use electricity or gas, or does the house use something else entirely? Older homes might have a boiler and radiator system or a baseboard heater that uses electricity.

What about a cooling system? Central air-conditioning systems (where cool air is distributed evenly throughout your house via the house’s air ducts) are very popular, especially in areas that experience hot summers. A common alternative to central air conditioning is an AC unit that’s mounted on windows or through walls. Instead of distributing air through ducts, these units blow cool air directly into the room in which they’re located.

Be sure to find a house that uses heating and cooling systems you’ll be happy with. Otherwise, make sure you understand what would be required to have a different system installed. Not only can the installation of a new system be costly, but if you’re going from a ductless system to one that uses air ducts, there needs to be enough space within your walls to install it.

8. Basement

When viewing the basement, make a note of whether it’s finished or remodeled. Some people prefer a finished basement for added living space, and basement remodels can be costly.

Keep an eye out for signs of water damage, take note of any musty smells and look for water stains or mold growth. You should also consider having a radon test done as part of your home inspection because basements in some areas exceed the maximum radon levels outlined by the Environmental Protection Agency.

If the basement is finished and you plan on spending a lot of time in it, pay attention to how much lighting it has. It should also have at least one accessible door or window in case you need to get out quickly in an emergency.

9. Attic

If you get the chance to peek into the attic yourself, look for signs of leaks and damage to the roof’s structure. Be on the lookout for animal droppings as well, since that could indicate an infestation you need to worry about. Rodents in your attic can cause a lot of damage.

Also, take note of the attic's ventilation and insulation. What kind of insulation is it? Does it appear wet or water stained? If so, be sure to mention them to your home inspector.

10. Garage

If you have more than one car or plan on using it for an additional purpose outside of parking, you might want a multiple-car garage. Make a note of the total amount of parking space the lot has, including the length and width of the driveway and if there’s street parking available.

You may also want to ask yourself some of the following questions:

Is the garage attached or separate from the house?

Do you need room to store and organize your stuff or a spot for a workbench?

How much garage space do you need?

When leaving, ensure that the garage door works well and appears to be in good condition.

 

WRITTEN BY: CHAMAN LAW FIRM TEAM

E-MAIL: chamanlawfirm@gmail.com / info.chamanlawfirm.com

TEL: 08065553671, 08024230080