WHAT IS ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION?

The definition and explanation of alternative dispute resolution that you should know.

CHAMAN LAW FIRM

2/10/2022 2 min read

WHAT IS ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION?

Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) is the procedure for settling disputes without litigation, such as arbitration, mediation, or negotiation. ADR procedures are usually less costly and more expeditious. They are increasingly being utilized in disputes that would otherwise result in litigation, including high-profile labor disputes, divorce actions, and personal injury claims.

Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) provides a confidential and alternative method of tackling legal disputes which avoids going to court. The most common types of ADR are mediation, conciliation, arbitration and adjudication.

One of the primary reasons parties may prefer ADR proceedings is that, unlike adversarial litigation, ADR procedures are often collaborative and allow the parties to understand each other's positions. ADR also allows the parties to come up with more creative solutions that a court may not be legally allowed to impose.

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) refers to the different ways people can resolve disputes without a trial. Common ADR processes include mediation, arbitration, and neutral evaluation. These processes are generally confidential, less formal, and less stressful than traditional court proceedings.

ADR often saves money and speeds settlement. In mediation, parties play an important role in resolving their own disputes. This often results in creative solutions, longer-lasting outcomes, greater satisfaction, and improved relationships.

Arbitration: a neutral person called an "arbitrator" hears arguments and evidence from each side and then decides the outcome. Arbitration is less formal than a trial and the rules of evidence are often relaxed. In binding arbitration, parties agree to accept the arbitrator’s decision as final, and there is generally no right to appeal. In nonbinding arbitration, the parties may request a trial if they do not accept the arbitrator’s decision.

Mediation: a neutral person called a "mediator" helps the parties try to reach a mutually acceptable resolution of the dispute. The mediator does not decide the case, but helps the parties communicate so they can try to settle the dispute themselves. Mediation may be particularly useful when family members, neighbors, or business partners have a dispute. Mediation may be inappropriate if a party has a significant advantage in power or control over the other. Learn more about Mediation.

Neutral Evaluation: a neutral person with subject-matter expertise hears abbreviated arguments, reviews the strengths and weaknesses of each side’s case, and offers an evaluation of likely court outcomes in an effort to promote settlement. The neutral evaluator may also provide case planning guidance and settlement assistance with the parties' consent.

Conciliation

Conciliation is generally used for employment situations rather than commercial disputes. Conciliation is a compulsory process before an individual wishes to bring a claim to the Employment Tribunal. The conciliator will discuss the issues and try to help the parties reach an agreement, often providing their own opinion after assessing the situation and the different arguments. Their opinion may help to form a settlement or achieve a conclusion to the dispute. For more information, please see our guide on conciliation.

 

WRITTEN BY: CHAMAN LAW FIRM TEAM

E-MAIL: chamanlawfirm@gmail.com / info.chamanlawfirm.com

TEL: 08065553671, 08024230080